Studies adAPT study – Type 1 Diabetes Prevention Trial

adAPT study – Type 1 Diabetes Prevention Trial

adAPT study – Type 1 Diabetes Prevention Trial

The adAPT study – Type 1 Diabetes Prevention Trial

The Autoimmune diabetes Accelerator Prevention Trial (adAPT) is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) designed to prevent type 1 diabetes in young people, and to test the accelerator hypothesis, a new and alternative explanation for type 1 diabetes.

adAPT is sponsored by the University of Exeter, know for the TrialNet studies, funded by JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) and conducted in the UK by TCTU (Tayside Clinical Trials Unit)

adAPT is, first and foremost, a family study. They are looking for brothers and sisters aged between 5 and 16 years old with a sibling who developed type 1 diabetes when they were under the age of 25. They would also like to involve the offspring aged between 5 and 16 years of a parent who developed type 1 diabetes when they were under the age of 25.

Recruitment is commencing now in Tayside, then soon moving to cover all of Scotland, they then anticipate to cover England later in the year, but there are no firms plans as yet. If you are interested in knowing more get in touch with them, you can email or call 01382383991 for more information.

A note from Steve Greene, Professor of Diabetes at Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, and co-investigator with adAPT:

“Clinical trials require an enormous effort to conduct, and cost an awful lot of money. adAPT involves more than 40 investigators, and will cost more than $10m to complete. The most important factor in the success of a trial such as adAPT is the participants and their families. Without sufficient participants the trial will fail. adAPT is a truly national study, the first of it’s kind in paediatrics to cover the whole of Scotland and the North of England, so I would urge you please to join if your family qualifies. What a prize for Scotland if together we could show the world for the very first time how to reduce childhood diabetes, the fastest rising chronic illness in people under the age of 16 years.”

adAPT Type 1 Diabetes prevention study